Residential School Project - Is the Past Present?

The Arts Metaverse development team has started working on a new project with Leah May Walker, Associate Director of the Divison of Aboriginal People's Health within the Faculty of Medicine, and Dr. Linc Kesler, Director of the First Nations Studies Program, at the University British Columbia, to create an educational and interactive role-play environment using 3D modeling technology.  

 

The system of Residential Schools in Canada had, and continues to have, a profound effect on the wellbeing and opportunities of and for Aboriginal communities. An online role-play provides the educational infrastructure for students to learn about the rationale for the Residential School system, as well as Aboriginal peoples' reponses to it. Students will adopt a role and engage with a realistic 3D model of a Residential School to solve challenges and have a glimpse into the life of a student at a Residential School.

 

Please take a look at our Image Gallery to view screen shots of the interior and exterior of the Residential School 3D model. More images will be added to the gallery in the coming months. For more information, please contact us at arts_metaverse@mail.arts.ubc.ca

Machu Picchu

The Arts Metaverse development team is working with Dr. Marvin Cohodas, Art History Professor at the University of British Columbia, to recreate a 3-D replica of the popular Machu Picchu historical and archeological site; a pre-Columbian Inca ruin located in southeastern Peru. 

 

The genesis of this project sprang from the idea of taking students from the classroom to the ancient ruins without actually having to travel there. Dr. Cohodas wanted his students to experience walking on an ancient ruin site such as Manchu Picchu, and to interact with the environment - an experience they could not have by looking at pictures or viewing a video clip.  Arts Metaverse allows students to travel virtually to Machu Picchu, to touch it and to move objects around it; to look at 3-D art that could have been placed in it or nearby, and to even have a class on the ancient ruins.  While in the virtual Machu Picchu metaverse, students can interact with each other with text messages or verbally with computer microphones. The instructor, meanwhile, can lecture digitally, show them a video clip and an interesting webpage while they sit on the ruins.  Furthermore, students can instantly see any changes that the instructor makes on his/her computer while they are virtually inside the Machu Picchu metaverse while potentially sharing their own resources with their peers as well.

 

Please take a look at our Image Gallery to view screen shots of Machu Picchu within Arts Metaverse.  For more information, please contact us at arts_metaverse@mail.arts.ubc.ca

UBC Campus

Thousands of students attend the University of British Columbia (UBC) every day.  They attend class, visit art galleries, have lunch at the Rose Garden, and watch student performances.  Their experience at UBC enriches their minds academically and socially, through their interactions with peers and professors.  How about students who are not able to come to campus every day or not at all?  How about those who live far from UBC but are taking some form of online course (either fully online or blended with some face-to-face classes)? Without visiting the UBC campus or having limited access, students are not be able to share in the experience that the on-campus students have every day. 

 

The UBC Campus metaverse provides students the opportunity to go to UBC virtually.  They can sit in classrooms, tour a student Art Gallery, watch student performances, and interact with peers without having to commute over long distances.  Academically, the UBC Campus metaverse provides instructors the ability to engage online students in collaborative activities (i.e. asking students to explore and discuss a webpage or complate a group activity synchronously together).

 

Please take a look at our Image Gallery to view screen shots of the UBC Campus within Arts Metaverse.  For more information, please contact us at arts_metaverse@mail.arts.ubc.ca

Mayan Vase Viewer

The Arts Metaverse development team worked with Dr. Marvin Cohodas, Art History Professor at the University of British Columbia, to develop a virtual 3D turntable for viewing ancient Mayan vases. These vases, or cylindrical vessels, have painted narrative scenes that flow from left-to-right. Initially, the vase viewer was created inside Second Life and it is currently being developed for the Croquet platform.

 

Traditionally, art history students study Mayan art by looking at still photographs or rollouts of the vases. This method of studying the ancient vases gives students a static and artificial view of the narrative illustrations. Dr. Cohodas wanted to create a device that would allow his students to view anicent Mayan art authentically and, therefore, be able to have a deeper understanding of the painted stories. The virtual Mayan Vase Viewer, allows students to virtually rotate the vase from left-to-right and view one-third of it at a time. Thus, students can read the story illustrated on the vase and make a correct interpretation of it.

 

Please take a look at our Image Gallery to view screen shots of the Mayan Vase Viewer within Second Life.  For more information, please contact us at arts_metaverse@mail.arts.ubc.ca

Bonampak

The Arts Metaverse development team worked with Dr. Marvin Cohodas, Art History Professor at the University of British Columbia, to develop a 3D virtual version of the Temple of the Murals (Structure 1) located on the ancient Mayan archaeological site of Bonampak in Chiapas, Mexico. This particular building is the home of many impressive narrative murals that art historians and students from around the world continue to study.

 

Typically, art history students have studied published watercolor copies of the Bonampak murals and have tried to intrpret the narrative sequence as much as possible. Dr. Cohodas wanted his undergraduate art history students to gain a deeper and more accurate understanding of the murals. Recreating the Temple of the Murals in a three-dimensional environment (Second Life), gave his students the opprotunity to virtually enter each room, view each wall, and subsequently be able to decipher the story behind each mural in a much more interactive, authentic and effective manner than studying watercolor renditions. Furthermore, due to the Temple of the Mural's small size, only three visitors are permitted to enter the original building in Chiapas. The 3D environment allows for a number of vistors (i.e. students, professors, etc.) to enter the building at the same time allowing for a collaborative learning experience.

 

Please take a look at our Image Gallery to view screen shots of Temple of the Murals in Bonampak within Second Life.  For more information, please contact us at arts_metaverse@mail.arts.ubc.ca

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